Family Law Hub

The Family Court: Work in Progress?

Recording of webinar first broadcast on 14 July 2014.

  • The Family Court was born on 22 April after a flurry of last minute rules, programmes and guidance. Yet the President's latest View makes clear that this is not the end point and there is still much work to do. 

    In this webinar Nigel Shepherd & Roger Bamber of Mills & Reeve and Matthew Long & Miriam Foster of 29 Bedford Row eview how the new procedures are bedding down and what further changes are likely in the forseeable future. Along the way they offer practical insight on any best practice now emerging

    Programme

    1 - Overview of the changes so far

    2 - How the new Court is working: 

    regional variations

    the Child Arrangements Programme

    Gatekeeping

    bundles

    3 - What's in the pipeline? 

    Update on orders project

    Further FPR changes

    Money Arrangements Programme

    Administrative divorce

    Running Time: 68 mins



Webcast, published: 16/07/2014

Topics


Published: 16/07/2014

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